21
Jun
16

Food For Thought About Changing Borders


Over the past few months I’ve seen a few Christians expressing negative opinions about the growing number of Moslem refugees flooding into the west. Some of those comments seem to have been inspired by fear of the changes that such an “invasion” would bring about. I felt at times there was also a degree of national pride and wanting to protect a certain national identity and should I say it? Protect the comfortable, comparatively affluent lifestyle the west has grown to enjoy.

But today I came across an interview and an article that hint of other possibilities that indicate a possible twist on a well-known saying: “If the gospel won’t come to Mohammed, then Mohammed must go to the gospel.”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/05/european-churches-growing-flock-muslim-refugees-converting-christianity

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/counterpoint/crossing-over:-muslims-converting-to-christianity/7523160

While there may be reason for caution in accepting accounts of mass conversions from Islam to Christianity (and some of the content at the above links expresses more than a degree of suspicion), do we need to doubt the reality that at least some of them are genuine? That God IS working in a situation where, for a time, borders have been flexible?

Instead of seeing threat should we be seeing opportunity?

From one man He made all the nations, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and He marked out their appointed times in history and the boundaries of their lands. God did this so that they would seek Him and perhaps reach out for Him and find Him,

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2 Responses to “Food For Thought About Changing Borders”


  1. 1 Marleen
    June 22, 2016 at 8:35 am

    I read the Guardian article — and they have a lot of good informative articles — I appreciate the link. Something not said is that there are different approaches to Christianity [besides the fact that I see “Christianity” per se as rooted in violence itself, which is not to say I see what Jesus taught as violent]. In addition to religious considerations, there is the modern legal evaluation as to whether an individual has to be accepted by a group in order to be real; Europe (not all of Europe) is more inclined to see things that way (the U.S. accepts that there and here but doesn’t expect it). On the other hand, there are unofficial groups that see you as an insider Christian if you’ve learned to tell people to shut up and warp their minds and effectively punish those victimized. But anyway, it’s not a proper attitude for us to be nationalistic about faith or race and people who are different…

    …because, as you are indicating, faith is supposed to be hopeful — and helpful to others.

  2. 2 Marleen
    June 24, 2016 at 6:56 am

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/06/21/politics/escaped-yazidi-slave-isis-us-fight/?iid=ob_lockedrail_bottomlarge

    ….

    She recounted how six of her brothers and her mother were executed by ISIS in a single day.

    Murad said she escaped to Mosul where a Muslim family helped her obtain fake Islamic identification that enabled her to escape ISIS territory.

    “I was freed, but I do not (have) the feeling of the freedom….”


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