Covenant and Controversy part 2

 

This is the second of a series of three videos. Part one has already been posted. The other part will be posted later.

The videos can also be accessed and downloaded via the vimeo site by clicking on the “vimeo” logo at the bottom of the video.

I have downloaded the films from that site onto a USB stick, I find that format makes it easier for me to watch half an hour at a time rather than have to find time to watch it all at once.

I think the films are very well written and produced and I highly recommend them.

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Covenant and Controversy part 1

Covenant and Controversy Part One: The Great Rage from Covenant & Controversy on Vimeo.

This is the first of a series of three videos. The other two parts will be posted over the next week or two.

The videos can also be accessed and downloaded via the vimeo site by clicking on the “vimeo” logo at the bottom of the video.

I have downloaded the films from that site onto a USB stick, I find that format makes it easier for me to watch half an hour at a time rather than have to find time to watch it all at once.

I think the films are very well written and produced and I highly recommend them.

Salvation Is Hard

A few days ago I posted some thoughts on my blog under the title Practicality vs Airy Fairy.

Those thoughts were inspired by the contrast I’d seen between the very practical content of Jeff’s  recent series of articles on his Anti-itch Meditation blog about Justification, and an article sent to me by a friend that seemed to be all “head in the clouds” with little practical meaning; an article written by a very respected Christian identity.

This current article on Jeff’s site continues the practical and challenging line of his justification writings.

anti-itch meditation

Many years ago I was talking to an older guy about fixing a broken something or other. He was a handyman type, knew how to fix everything. I’m a waste of space at fixing things.

He was telling me how simple it was to do this repair. To emphasize how simple it was he said, “It’s as easy as getting saved.”

I was stunned by his statement. I remember laughing and saying something like, “Hm, I never thought getting saved was all that easy.” He was then stunned by my statement!

There are many who think “getting saved” is easy. If you view justification by faith alone the way most do–nodding your head yes at the appropriate time of the emotional Gospel presentation–then yeah, getting saved is easy.

Easy Salvation agrees to the facts of the Gospel and you’re good to go.

What amazes me is watching Jesus Christ talk…

View original post 385 more words

Blinded

The god of this age has blinded the minds of unbelievers, so that they cannot see the light of the gospel that displays the glory of Christ, who is the image of God.

The world at large has no idea of what it means to believe in God, or as a result to actually BELIEVE God above anything and anyone else.

They also can’t seem to get their minds around the fact that those who do believe,  REALLY believe that God is important enough to be given priority, and that we don’t consider Him to be a mere addendum to everything else in our lives. (He’s not just a hobby).

Therefore we should not be concerned that putting God first will make Christianity or the church unpopular. We aren’t looking for ways to make Christianity attractive (or shouldn’t be). We are not looking for ways to make Him, or our faith in Him, seem relevant to an unbelieving society.

Our desire should be for truth and directed towards the Truth, no matter how unpopular that may make us and our beliefs.

But of course there’s a proviso. We need to be sure that we ARE standing for Truth and not some religious counterfeit of it.

Another Day In Paradise

The exhibition of Myuran Sukumaran paintings mentioned in the video I posted yesterday moved from Sydney to Canberra at the beginning of March. On Saturday I saw it for myself. It closes on the 29th April but will reopen at the Bendigo Art Gallery in Victoria from 7th July to 16th September 2018.

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It was the most emotionally challenging exhibition I’ve experienced. Even Gloria, who isn’t generally interested in art exhibitions was deeply affected.

 

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The exhibition started with a large portrait of Sukumaran, displayed at the bottom of stairs leading up to the exhibition rooms. The painting was very reminiscent of Ben Quilty’s style, and after leaving the gallery I started to wonder whether it had actually been by Quilty – I couldn’t remember reading the attribution beside the painting, however, I’m now confident that it was one of Sukumaran’s.

The rest of the paintings were split between two rooms.

Within the first exhibition room, the first paintings are a series depicting the “Bali Nine”, very recognisable portraits of Sukumaran, Andrew Chan, and the other seven who were arrested with them and imprisoned for drug trafficking in April 2005.

On the opposite wall were a similar series of paintings (I now wonder whether there were nine of those too – I didn’t think to count) of political figures associated with the case, firstly Indonesian president Joko Widodo, the man who ensured Sukumaran and Chan were shot, followed by others including portraits of Tony Abbott (then Australian PM) Julie Bishop (Foreign Minister) and former Prime Ministers Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard.

This is the Sukumaran’s last painting. It was displayed suspended from the ceiling, about 45cms away from the wall allowing the back of the board to be seen.
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The back of the board has messages written by all of those who were scheduled to be executed along with Sukumaran and Chan. The messages include one from Mary Jane Veloso, from the Philippines, who was given a last minute reprieve. Her fight to avoid execution continues three years later.

back of flag

The second room had family portraits and a wall of paintings from Sukumaran’s final 72 hours.

He made the most of that time, with some of his most emotionally raw and revealing work, as he tried to get as much on canvas as was possible while he could, knowing he had only hours to live.

The part of the exhibition that I consider to be a very moving conclusion was set up in an alcove-like area of the second room. Two large TV screens faced each other from opposite walls. On one it appeared to have a large still image of Andrew Chan facing the camera, eyes obscured by dark glasses. However tiny head movements revealed it was a close up video with Chan staring into the camera.

On the other screen, there was a similar image of Sukumaran staring back towards Chan, with an occasional blink “spoiling” the apparent stillness before finally. breaking into a smile.

This video installation emphasises what was lost with the unnecessary (and foolishly cruel) decision to  kill the two men; two men who were NOT the same people they had been when arrested and condemned to die ten years before.

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Sukumaran, Chan and six others were bound, by the elbows, to a cross like this. To each of them were allocated twelve marksmen, training their sights upon the heart of their designated victims, most of whom sang hymns until their voices were silenced by the fatal shots.

 

 

Myu’s last words were ‘Jesus, I trust in you’

(Christie Buckingham , Sukumaran’s chosen spiritual adviser who accompanied him to, and witnessed, his execution)

 

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see: https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2017/jan/14/another-day-in-paradise-review-a-raw-emotional-insight-into-bali-nine-artists-life-on-death-row

and

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/gallery/2017/jan/14/another-day-in-paradise-bali-nine-member-myuran-sukumarans-art-in-pictures