Mankind’s Response to God’s Son: Consequences

“You are my son;
today I have become your Father.

Kiss His son, or He will be angry
and your way will lead to your destruction

Psalm 2

Why do the nations conspire
and the peoples plot in vain?
The kings of the earth rise up
and the rulers band together
against the LORD and against his anointed, saying,
“Let us break their chains
and throw off their shackles.”
The One enthroned in heaven laughs;
the Lord scoffs at them.
He rebukes them in his anger
and terrifies them in his wrath, saying,
“I have installed my king
on Zion, my holy mountain.”
I will proclaim the LORD’s decree:
He said to me, “You are my son;
today I have become your father.
Ask me,
and I will make the nations your inheritance,
the ends of the earth your possession.
You will break them with a rod of iron
you will dash them to pieces like pottery.”
Therefore, you kings, be wise;
be warned, you rulers of the earth.
Serve the LORD with fear
and celebrate his rule with trembling.
Kiss his son, or he will be angry
and your way will lead to your destruction,
for his wrath can flare up in a moment.
Blessed are all who take refuge in him.

God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him.
Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe stands condemned already because they have not believed in the name of God’s one and only Son.

This is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil. Everyone who does evil hates the light, and will not come into the light for fear that their deeds will be exposed. But whoever lives by the truth comes into the light, so that it may be seen plainly that what they have done has been done in the sight of God (John 3

He was in the world, and though the world was made through him, the world did not recognize him.  He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him. Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God— children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God. (John 1)

Cherry Bounce/The American Elections: An Invitational Exhibit at the William King Museum

I love this artist’s work: an abstract and symbolic expression of her Christian faith in paint and collage.

This is the latest post from her blog about some of her recent paintings.

grace carol bomer

Last year, guest curator Eric Drummond Smith invited me to be part of the “historical” show Cherry Bounce/ The American Elections at the William King Museum in Abingdon, VA. It was historical in subject matter–its theme the history of the American elections from George Washington to Barack Obama, the 44th President. His well-chosen title Cherry Bounce, an Appalachian liquor, alluded to either hope or despair as we anticipated the yet undecided outcome of the November 2016 election. It was historical because Nixon. jpegI was assigned the Nixon/McGovern race of 1972 (the Nixon poster called for “a sense of history, not histrionics”), and historical also because my own Christian faith believes all of history is a story with a divine plot and the post-Fall battle for power.

I am a painter who is conscious of this “grand narrative” called history. My statement reads, “Bomer is concerned with the human condition surprised by…

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Golgotha Reworked

A major local exhibition is approaching, but I’ve done very little painting over the last year or two.  I missed the same event in 2016, but want to participate this year.

My hope of completing one or two new works has been undermined by the weather. It’s been too hot to work in my garage studio. This month we’ve only had one day below 30 degrees C, and throughout January it was the same. Most days we’ve been in the high 30s, with a few over 40 degrees C. Not the best conditions for painting in an uncooled garage.

As a compromise I’ve looked back at some of my earlier paintings and have decided to rework one of the larger canvases. What started out as this:

golgotha

 

Now looks more like this:

 

 

golgotha

The difference in the crucifixion image is an illusion caused by different lighting conditions when the two photos were taken.

No change was made to that part of the painting.

More work needs to be done, but at this stage I’m considering two or three different ideas. Entries for the exhibition need to be in by 3rd March, so I have a little over two weeks to finish my changes.

 

Ben Quilty and Syrian Refugee Crisis

Quilty Confronts Syrian refugee crisis

 
Earlier this year the celebrated Australian artist Ben Quilty and the equally lauded author, Richard Flanagan, travelled to Europe and the Middle East to witness the refugee crisis in those regions.

They’ve since returned home and Ben Quilty’s new exhibition opening this week at the Art Gallery of South Australia is his interpretation of that experience.

Barbara Miller visited the artist in his studio.

See video here:

 http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-07/quilty-confronts-syrian-refugee-crisis/8003348

Also: Confronting mortality.

Artist Ben Quilty and author Richard Flanagan make a harrowing trip to Europe and the Middle East to witness first-hand the refugee crisis.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-07/confronting-mortality:-ben-quilty-confronts-the-syrian-exodus/7995244

 

to the angel of the church in Smyrna

The words of the first and the last, who died and came to life.

smyrna

Do not fear any of those things which you are about to suffer. Indeed, the devil is about to throw some of you into prison, that you may be tested, and you will have tribulation ten days. Be faithful until death, and I will give you the crown of life.

“He who has an ear, let him hear what the Spirit says to the churches. He who overcomes shall not be hurt by the second death.”’

Revelation 2

_______________

See also: Isaiah 44:6 and Revelation 12:13;

Blokes’ Exhibition 2016

It’s been over a year since I’ve entered my work into an exhibition, but yesterday I dropped four paintings into the local gallery to be included in their annual “Blokes’ Exhibition”.

2015 was a lazy year during which I did little painting. The only thing I started remains unfinished, but this year I have at last picked up my brushes again. While I have very little new output I wanted to give my support to the “Blokes” in the hope that it continues as a regular event in the gallery. I sorted out some of my older work and added the only painting I’ve done this year.

When I look at what I’ve submitted, I find two of them are appropriately relevant to the feast of Passover. The one in the illustration is called Passover and was the first of my paintings that I was really happy with, it gave me confidence that I wasn’t wasting time (and paint) in trying to be an artist.

passover

The following painting is another old one I’ve entered, called Redemption.
Not illustrated in the photo is the basic frame that I made for it that I think has improved it considerably.
Redemption

With this one I won first prize in the mixed media category at the agricultural show a few years ago. [Shhh! Don’t tell anyone, but it was the only entry in that category].

At the time of posting this I don’t have photos of the other two paintings. I might get the chance to take some at the gallery on the weekend.

“New” National Gallery of Australia

On the weekend I went to the National Gallery in Canberra. I think it was my first time this year, after making multiple visits each year since 2011 when I first started painting.

Every time I went to Canberra, the gallery would be one place I’d regularly visit. On one occasion I spent a whole day there, apart from an hour when I walked down the road to the nearby National Portrait Gallery.

This year I’ve done very little painting, and as a result had less desire to go to the NGA.

A few weeks ago I caught a short news item on TV about recent changes to the Gallery’s exhibition spaces.
In the simplest terms, there had been a switching of the International and Australian galleries. What had been downstairs, (International paintings) had been swapped with those that had been upstairs (Australian paintings).
Another claimed change was the lighting of Pollock’s Blue Poles. New lights had been created specifically for the Pollock to give a truer view of the colours used, so the painting for the first time would look exactly as it should.

This was my first visit since the changes, and I was very disappointed with what had been done.

Firstly the place seemed over-lit. The brightness created a clinical sterility.
Secondly I felt there was no logical flow of ideas, styles or eras in the display of the art.
I could also see no difference with Blue Poles, despite the special lighting.

On the positive side, Colin McCahon’s Victory Over Death 2 had a much better location. It was once again hanging at a more favourable height after spending a couple of years of hung 4 metres above floor level over an enquiry counter.VOD2

Also, near VOD2 I saw Abendland [Twilight of the West] by Anslem Kiefer for the first time. A massive 4 metre x 4 metre heavily textured work that I loved. Abendland [Twilight of the West Anslem Kiefer

It is now one of my three favourites in the gallery. The other two being McCahon’s VOD2 and Imants Tillers Terra Incognita, another massive artwork that is full of detail; a painting that could be viewed for hours to find all of the images and text it incorporates.
terra invognita tillers

I’m Now a “Professional” Artist!

I’m now a “professional” artist.

Last week one of my paintings sold – my very first sale.

Gloria and I went into our favourite coffee shop, where some of my work has been displayed over the past two or three years, and the shop owner handed me an envelope containing money. I hadn’t even noticed that the painting was missing until she told me it had been sold.

For about a month now I’ve been saying I should change the painting for another one – but kept forgetting. I’m now thankful for my forgetfulness.

This is the painting, called “Overshadowed”.

Overshadowed

The painting contains the following symbols and text.

1) The cup of wine representing the shed blood of Jesus.

2) A doorway with blood applied to the posts and lintel (think Passover)

3) The word RE ME MB ER spread around the corners

4) The letter “Y” – a symbol I use to represent the form of the crucified Jesus

5) The image of a parrot, that I use to represent tradition and the way teachings are so often “parroted” from generation to generation.