Archive for the 'prophecy' Category

16
Jul
17

Mankind’s Response to God’s Son: Consequences

“You are my son;
today I have become your Father.

Kiss His son, or He will be angry
and your way will lead to your destruction

Psalm 2

Why do the nations conspire
and the peoples plot in vain?
The kings of the earth rise up
and the rulers band together
against the LORD and against his anointed, saying,
“Let us break their chains
and throw off their shackles.”
The One enthroned in heaven laughs;
the Lord scoffs at them.
He rebukes them in his anger
and terrifies them in his wrath, saying,
“I have installed my king
on Zion, my holy mountain.”
I will proclaim the LORD’s decree:
He said to me, “You are my son;
today I have become your father.
Ask me,
and I will make the nations your inheritance,
the ends of the earth your possession.
You will break them with a rod of iron
you will dash them to pieces like pottery.”
Therefore, you kings, be wise;
be warned, you rulers of the earth.
Serve the LORD with fear
and celebrate his rule with trembling.
Kiss his son, or he will be angry
and your way will lead to your destruction,
for his wrath can flare up in a moment.
Blessed are all who take refuge in him.

God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him.
Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe stands condemned already because they have not believed in the name of God’s one and only Son.

This is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil. Everyone who does evil hates the light, and will not come into the light for fear that their deeds will be exposed. But whoever lives by the truth comes into the light, so that it may be seen plainly that what they have done has been done in the sight of God (John 3

He was in the world, and though the world was made through him, the world did not recognize him.  He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him. Yet to all who did receive him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God— children born not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God. (John 1)

02
May
17

Watch out that no one deceives you (end time warning)

When Jesus’s disciples asked him about the signs of the end, and Jesus (2nd) coming, Jesus prefaced His answer with the warning:
“Watch out that no one deceives you. For many will come in my name, claiming, ‘I am the Messiah,’ and will deceive many.”

I’m sure that preface wasn’t insignificant or merely a throw-away line, not was it placed at the beginning of his answer by accident. End time teaching, speculation and prophetic claims are considerably prone to error and therefore we should be extra-wary – making sure we search the scriptures for ourselves, testing everything.

I started my Christian life at a time when “the end times” were a favoured topic, with best selling books devoted to near future events and the imminent fulfilment of end time Bible prophecy. In particular Hal Lindsay’s The Late Great Planet Earth was considered essential reading.

In keeping with Lindsay’s pre-trib. rapture message, I displayed a sticker in my car warning passengers of the danger of the car becoming driverless should the rapture occur during the journey.

The “threat” of an imminent rapture was commonly used in evangelism. Churches would screen a film Like a Thief in the Night and its sequels, showing the scary outcome for those who missed the rapture and were “Left Behind” (as in the popular, more recent, series of novels). It seemed many people could no longer be motivated to faith by a fear of hell, so fear of future events, of God’s wrath upon a post-rapture world were utilised instead.*

But how much of all of that was REALLY in line with biblical accounts of the end time?

Not a lot. That’s what I discovered when I finally took the time to study what scripture itself said, in contrast to what popular Christian media was promoting; or what was so often being preached in the churches I attended.

So much of what was stated as “gospel truth” turned out to be wrong. Henry Kissinger wasn’t the antichrist. The imminent rapture didn’t happen. Life went on and my passengers weren’t left alone in a driverless car. The antichrist’s Europe grew well beyond the beast’s ten kingdoms (and more recently has shown to be prone to imploding).
Most of the speculation that had been heralded as “biblical” has long become out-dated.

Maybe all of that has led to a weariness, instilling a feeling of disillusionment and forcing a reassessment of the importance of the “end times”, where the attitude has caused people to consider:

“Where is this ‘coming’ he promised? Ever since our ancestors died, everything goes on as it has since the beginning of creation.”

And that is the danger of unbiblical teaching. It leads to unbiblical conclusions and expectations and can make us weary of very important matters.

Regarding the end times, maybe more than many other issues, we NEED to be sure our understanding is grounded in the truth of scripture. As mentioned above, Jesus prefaced His prophecies of the end times with a warning: “Watch out that no one deceives you”. And he didn’t leave it there with a solitary statement. The whole section where He details end time events is full of warnings intended top equip the believer to overcome and survive through very difficult times, when it will seem easier to go with the flow instead of standing out from the crowd to proclaim the truth.

____________________________

* I would argue that fear isn’t necessary the best motivation to get people interested in the gospel – especially fears based on false expectations, such as missing out on a pre-trib rapture.

01
Oct
15

Article by Tricia Tillin: “Nailing My Rapture Colours To The Mast”

The majority of the long article at the link below addresses the subject of “the rapture” but I think it has value beyond that single topic. It also looks into the wider issue of how easily we allow ourselves to accept teachings that lack a biblical foundation.

As I read it, I found a lot of my own experience being described, including the way my understanding of “the rapture” and the Tribulation period changed completely when I put aside what I’d been taught at church (and through popular books) and spent time learning what scripture actually said about the matter.

No doctrine can be established by applying different principles to similar texts, nor by overlaying scripture with an interpretation derived from another, dissimilar, part of the bible. We must not “read between the lines” when the lines themselves state the obvious. Nor do we have the freedom to extrapolate from the given text something that it does not teach, even when that doctrine appears elsewhere in the bible.

The scripture means what it says. We can’t turn it around, play with words, and mould it into something else. I have personally experienced this very thing. I even participated in it, to my shame.

In the day when I was deluded by the Word-of-Faith groups, I used to wink at their mishandling and twisting of scripture, because it confirmed my/their beliefs. I refused to listen to reason, or to anyone who said otherwise. I got defensive, angry even, at those who tried to open my eyes.

I remember sitting in conferences, and listening to audio tapes, and as somebody who knew the bible well my mind gave a little jolt when I heard these WoF teachers interpret the bible texts to mean something fanciful and wild. But I overlooked it! I winked at it! I excused them.

I told myself, “well they must be right because they know more than I do, and anyway, this teaching is very positive and uplifting and it makes me feel good.”

I didn’t WANT to be dissuaded.

I had the same sense of angry indignation when any of my friends tried to argue me out of WoF. I got hot, defensive, loud in the defense of my preferred interpretation (while inside having a few niggling doubts.)

Indeed, the more my doubts grew, the more defensive and aggressive I became. I was, in effect, putting my fingers in my ears and singing LaLaLaLa! I didn’t WANT to be persuaded!

Eventually, God shook me awake.

read complete article here:

http://www.birthpangs.org/articles/biblical/nailing-colours.html

05
Jun
15

Left the Prophetic Movement?

Recently I posted details of an article on Andrew Strom’s Revival School blog. He made some very important points regarding the “ministry” of Bill Johnson and his Bethel church.

How disappointing it was to come across the latest addition to Andrew’s blog. He’s back to posting “prophecy” from proven false prophets.

Today he posted another “prophecy”, this one from a man who more than a decade ago, prior to the 2nd Bush family invasion of Iraq, “prophesied” that weapons of mass destruction would be found in Iraq.

He was a false prophet then.
He remains a false prophet now.

For an interesting view of false prophets I recommend that Andrew Strom refers to the article here:

http://www.johnthebaptisttv.com/why-i-left-the-prophetic-movement/

I’ll end this post with a little secret that is relevant to so much “prophecy” within the western church.
The gospel and God’s purposes are not centred on the USA or its President.
_________________________________________
To see the false prophecy I refer to, this is the link to the article on Andrew’s blog: http://www.revivalschool.com/america-after-obama-a-prophecy-comments/

28
Nov
13

Cessationism: Evidence or Not?

aNot long ago I posted something under the title “The Complete and Exhaustive Biblical Evidence of the Cessationist Viewpoint”.
The evidence provided was a blank page. Some people didn’t initially get the point and clicked on the page, assuming it provided a link to the “evidence”. However they soon discovered that the white page WAS the extent of the evidence that could be provided. I was making the point that there is no biblical evidence to support the cessationist view.

So what is cessationism? Basically it is the belief that the gifts of the Spirit and the apostolic gifts are no longer valid, that they were withdrawn very early in church history, either with the last of the biblical apostles or with the establishment of the canon of scripture.

For two or three weeks now I’ve been commenting on a blog where the owner has been promoting cessationism. During that time I have continually asked him for biblical evidence that the gifts are no available.

bHe had written several articles promoting his views – so it could be assumed that, having written so much in those articles, he would have given at least the appearance of solid evidence to support his stance. But that has not been the case. His evidence in the main has been to mock the excesses of extreme “charismatics” and inferring that their errors PROVE that all supposed spiritual gifts are false.

This is a summary of the kind of reasoning I’ve seen:
– charismatic prophecies have been proven false, therefore all claimed prophecies are false.
– claimed charismatic healings are questionable, therefore all claimed gifts of healings are false.
He also makes claims about the gift of tongues that I hope to deal with separately another time.

 

What I want to do here regarding the matter of cessationism is to make a few points about what is NOT valid evidence.

1) Pointing out the foolishness of extreme charismatics is NOT evidence of the validity of cessationism
2) Having an absence of gifts in one’s own life, or never having witnessed or experienced the gifts of the Spirit is not evidence of the validity of cessationism
3) When the claimed gifts practiced by others doesn’t match your own perception of what the gifts of the Spirit should be like, it is not evidence for the validity of cessationism
4) Using non-biblical terms to mock gifts (such as referring to tongues as “gibberish” is not legitimate evidence supporting cessationsim.

Note that ALL of the above relate in some way to personal experience instead of reference to scripture. Ironically one of the biggest criticisms levelled against charismatics is that they are too experience driven, and yet all of the objections above are no less relying on experience (or lack of it).

16
May
13

Coincidence? – NO!

In Matthew 24 there are recorded warnings from Jesus predicting the rise of false prophets and false Christs in the days preceding His return.

Surely it is no coincidence that two of the most common terms used by some of the most questionable elements of  “the church” are “prophetic” and “anointing”. I have written elsewhere* of the relationship between the words anointing and Christ (the latter meaning “anointed one”).

So I advise, whenever those words are in frequent use, be extra cautious.

 

 

* https://onesimusfiles.wordpress.com/category/anointing/

15
May
13

What Do You Do?

What do you do with a man who prophesies over himself in the comments box of his blog? – as if God Himself is visiting to add His comments?

What do you do when he rejects the concerns of several other Christians when concerns about his spiritual welfare are raised?

What do you do when he labels those concerns: “attacks from the spirit of witchcraft”, vilifying those who have shown concern?

What do you do when this man is also a regular and prolific commenter on the well-frequented Revival School blog (not his own) where he has developed a following of admirers through flattery, through the offering of “prophetic words” through a public show of piety?

What do you do when this man has an (unrepentant) history of involvement with false prophecy, such as the failed Christchurch earthquake prediction a couple of years ago?

Not much you can do except pray:

1) For his deliverance from delusion

2) For the eyes of his “followers” to be opened.




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