Priorities (journal 5)

You do not have because you do not ask God. When you ask, you do not receive, because you ask with wrong motives, that you may spend what you get on your pleasures. James 4: 2-3

Here are two reasons we fail to receive from God.

Firstly, what may seem to be blatantly obvious: not asking. If we don’t ask, how can we expect to receive? God does not just ‘sovereignly’ hand out answers to unprayed prayers – He desires (expects) our involvement and commitment.

Secondly is our reason for asking. Why do we want what we ask for? Is it for worldly pleasures? See the next verse (4) “You adulterous people, don’t you know that friendship with the world means enmity against God? Therefore anyone who chooses to be a friend of the world becomes God’s enemy”

A friend once pondered whether this might be a reason some didn’t receive healing. While healing IS God’s will, is our desire for healing linked to a desire to use our health and life for worldly instead of godly purposes?

God’s Promises (journal 2)

For no matter how many promises God has made, they are ‘Yes’ in Christ. And so through him the ‘Amen’ is spoken by us to the glory of God. 2 Corinthians 1:20

No prayer based on one of God’s promises will receive a ‘No’ answer. Failure to receive is due either to not fulfilling a stated condition, or a failure of belief. It is not because God is saying ‘no’.

Whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours. Mark 11:24


Praying in faith is having confidence that we have received (not that we will or could receive) even before we have the evidence of it.

God’s Will and Faith (journal 1)

This is the confidence we have in approaching God: that if we ask anything according to His will, He hears us.  And if we know that He hears us – whatever we ask – we know that we have what we asked of Him. 1 Jn 5:14-15

Knowing God’s will is an important aspect of prayer. It is essential for faith.

How can we truly believe and stand firm in unwavering faith if we aren’t certain that God wants us to have what we are asking for. Without that certainty, any expectation of success is presumptuous and not an act of faith.

Many things we seek are promised by God if certain conditions are met. Therefore, if we know something is promised and we know we have met the conditions, we can have the confidence referred to above.

Jesus is Alive! (and answers prayer)

In a phone call with my mum,  I was made aware of an exciting answer to prayer. Neither of my parents are believers. My dad in particular has been stubbornly resistant to being told anything about Jesus, always immediately changing the subject when Jesus is mentioned.

He has had a serious heart condition for many years, and in recent months it has become even worse, with only 20% heart function remaining. Earlier this year he also lost his sight completely, and it seems like he’s started to suffer sporadic dementia. For example, he recently had a stay in hospital and was convinced he had been returned home via helicopter. He now spends most of the day in bed, not knowing whether it is day or night.

Considering the difficulty of sharing the gospel with my dad, as well as how his health has been deteriorating significantly, I’ve been specifically praying that Jesus would visit him in his dreams or in his mind (considering he’s now sightless and is alone with his thoughts for most of the day).

This week he told my mum that a man had appeared “in his head”, who said to him: “people think  I’m dead, but I’m alive”. My mum asked him who the man had been, but my dad didn’t know, so she told him to ask his name if he came back again.

The man returned. My dad asked his name, and he was told “it is Jesus”.

I need to make clear that my dad’s experience and the words said to him are NOT something he was likely to think up for himself to feed his own imagination.

This experience not only offers hope for my dad (depending upon how he responds to this Divine visitation) it has also opened a door to share the gospel with my mum. I immediately let her know that this experience was a clear-cut answer to prayer.

Do You Believe Jesus?

What do you make of the following statements?
Do you believe them?
If so, what PRACTICAL effect does that belief have in your life?

If you believe, you will receive whatever you ask for in prayer. (Matt 21:22) NIV

I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, believe that you have received it, and it will be yours. (Mark 11:24) NIV

If you remain in me and my words remain in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you. (John 15:7) NIV

whatever you ask in my name the Father will give you. (John 15:16)NIV

Very truly I tell you, my Father will give you whatever you ask in my name. Until now you have not asked for anything in my name. Ask and you will receive, and your joy will be complete. (John 16:23-24) NIV

 

This is the confidence we have in approaching God: that if we ask anything according to his will, he hears us. And if we know that he hears us—whatever we ask—we know that we have what we asked of him. (1 John 5: 14-15) NIV

Are these promises we can actually believe?
Do we believe those promises to the extent that our lived experience is determined by them?

Or do we find ourselves having to “reinterpret” their meaning to make them fit our lived experience?

Does our faith in Jesus include believing what He said?
Does our faith in Jesus include believing in the wider scriptures , written by His disciples?

Is our faith in Jesus and God’s word or is it more focused on tradition and our personal experience?

In particular, what do we make of this?

Very truly I tell you, whoever believes in me will do the works I have been doing, and they will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father. And I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son. You may ask me for anything in my name, and I will do it. (John 14: 12-14) NIV

If Jesus said “whoever believes in [Him] will do…”, how is that being reflected in OUR lives as professing believers?

Are we experiencing those works and greater things in our lives?
Are we expecting those works and greater things to be part of our lives?

If not why not?

De Facto Calvinism

One of the main doctrines of Calvinism is that God alone determines who will be saved, and by exclusion, who will be damned to hell. That view is contrary to everything that scripture reveals about God and His desire that all should come to repentance.

But that is not the topic I want to discuss here.

What I’ve observed, and even realised about myself, is that many people who would reject those Calvinist ideas of “Limited Atonement” are no different to the Calvinists when it comes to other beliefs about God’s interaction with humanity.

What do I mean?

A personal example. How often I have taken for granted that my decisions will result in God’s will being done in my life? That I assume He will either endorse my decisions, or will somehow intervene and put a stop to what I’m doing before I become committed? That HE will “sovereignly” direct the outcome, even when I’ve failed to consult Him or seek His will on the matter.

A decade and a half ago I moved to a new town and bought a house – crediting God with the move, even though I’d made no effort at all to see whether that was what HE wanted.
In practice I was convincing myself  that the assumed permission and lack of interference, was an endorsement, otherwise He would “sovereignly” stop what I was doing.

Gloria, my wife, pointed out another example of De Facto Calvinism that has far more dangerous connotations than my own personal example. In my case the only ones affected were Gloria and myself.
In the following situation the effects are widespread and far more serious.

Not surprisingly, considering the content of so much of my recent writing, I’m referring to attitudes to healing. Gloria recognised that they are no different to the Calvinist belief in a Limited Atonement, that restricts forgiveness of sins and salvation to an “elect” sovereignly chosen by God.

Those attitudes insist that God sovereignly chooses who will be healed and who won’t be. That healing comes down solely to the personal decision of God. In other words it is determined much the same way that Calvinists insist that salvation is decided: by Divine whim.

While common, that view is completely at odds with scripture in so many ways.

Firstly, scripture is clear on the fact that physical healing is a benefit given by God alongside forgiveness of sins, and is included in the atoning sacrifice of Jesus. (Isaiah 53:3-5, Matt 8:16-17)

Secondly, God commands His people to “choose life” after giving them the choice between life and death. That should leave no doubt about God’s will in the matter.

Thirdly, Jesus Himself, doing NOTHING that wasn’t the will of the Father, healed ALL who were brought to Him or came to Him. He  later commissioned His followers to continue that ministry in His name, after He had returned to the Father.
(Mark 16: 15-18, John 20:21-22, )

Fourthly, God made available several different ways of healing, all of which require some kind of participation from the sick person, and the exercising of faith, either by the sick one or those ministering to them. Those ways include:

  1. Laying on of hands. (Mark 5:23, Mark 6:5, Mark 16:18, Luke 4:40, Acts 28:8,)
  2. Gifts of healing. (1 Corinthians 12 and possibly demonstrated in several cases of early church healings in Acts )
  3. Prayer of faith (James 5)
  4. Receiving and attending to Word of God. (Prov 4 Matt 8:8 )
  5. Faith of the seeker (Luke 17, and a most clear example Matt 9: 20-22 , Acts 14:8-10)
  6. Intercession and faith of someone else on behalf of a seeker. (Matt 15: 21-28, Acts 3, Matt 8:5-13 )
  7.  By Jesus’ name and through faith. (Acts 3:16)
  8. General prayer for “whatever” (including healing), as long as we believe, and/or diligently seek God.  (Mark 11:24, Matt 21:22, Heb 11:6, 1 John 5: 14-15,)
  9. Deliverance from demons, (Mark 9:25, Luke 7:21, Acts 5:16, Acts 8: 7,Acts 19:12,
  10. Special miracles of healing through “handkerchiefs and aprons”, or touching garments. (Acts 19:12,)
  11. Praying for each other. (James 5:16)

So instead of considering healing as something solely determined by God’s “sovereign choice”, or the domain of select people with certain spiritual gifts, we need to start believing and obeying God and His word, and take responsibility for  those things He has commissioned us to do in the name of Jesus.

In the same way that forgiveness of sins, and our acceptance into the family of God are through faith,  so are healing and any other benefit God has provided. They are through faith in Him and His word. Believing in Him, His generous promises and His desire for us to receive them. They are not awarded according to Divine lottery.
Instead of using “the sovereignty of God” as an excuse for our failure to receive from God, the following from Hebrews gives valuable instruction.

We want each of you to show this same diligence to the very end, so that what you hope for may be fully realized. We do not want you to become lazy, but to imitate those who through faith and patience inherit what has been promised.

AMEN!!!
 

 

Be Healed

Gloria and I have a Christian friend suffering from some worrying health issues. We’ve been praying for him each day and both of us separately felt led to visit and pray for him in person.
Gloria contacted his wife earlier today and suggested this, but the offer was declined.

Then later, we started watching a YouTube video of a sermon “Forget Not All HIs Benefits” – based on Psalm 103.

Praise the Lord, my soul;
all my inmost being, praise his holy name.
Praise the Lord, my soul,
and forget not all his benefits
who forgives all your sins
and heals all your diseases…

The very popular preacher insisted that “Heals all your diseases” did not mean physical disease, but only “diseases of the soul”.

Is it any wonder that sickness is accepted and tolerated among Christians when they are being taught such garbage?
Basically being taught that the Bible doesn’t really mean what the Bible clearly says?
And that particular teacher is the compiler of a “study bible” retailed under his own name (MacArthur Study Bible) so he can more fully explain what scripture “really” means, instead of what is actually written in the biblical text.

When are Christians going to wake up and STOP trusting in the teaching of those who deny and oppose God’s word and replace it with their own opinions?

Is it surprising that our friend – a Christian – should be hesitant/reluctant to receive personal prayer for healing, when so much false teaching has indoctrinated large sections of the church?

As an antidote to the above I share the following video.

Healing Prayer and Proclamation

Father, if I ask anything according to Your will, you hear me, and knowing that You hear me I have the assurance that I have whatever I’ve asked of You.

Your Word makes it clear that Your will for me is healing, health and life. So I ask for those in the confident expectation that I have received them and they will be mine, in accordance to Your Word.

You are the Lord Who heals me.
You will take away disease and give me a full life span.
I called out to You and You sent Your Word of life and healed me of all diseases, so I will not die but live, and will proclaim what You have done.

I choose life so that I may live and love You, LORD my God. I will listen to Your voice and hold fast to You, because You are my life.

Jesus bore my sicknesses and diseases, and by His Wounds I have been healed.
And in Jesus’ name, as one of your children through faith in Him, I believe I have received.

AMEN!!!

Giving Careful Thought to the Paths… Fellowship

It’s been several years now since I’ve been involved with a church.

After moving to my current town, I attended a sizeable (by the town’s standards) charismatic fellowship, but found it was too enthralled with a variety of fads, and had an unfortunate, close relationship with teachings and practices originating in the Toronto “Blessing”.

Following that I went to the other extreme and was involved in a traditional denominational church, that was sadly steeped in Calvinism. After a year or so I chose to leave them to prevent the increasing conflict that would have continued had I stayed.

In a small country town, there aren’t many options.

While I, and my faith, survived despite the limited fellowship opportunities – clearly my current situation shows that neither thrived.

Now, with my determination to seek God to turn things around, the church/fellowship issue has become the next thing I need to address. But how?

At the moment I’m following up two options. One local and one in Canberra.

The local fellowship is very small, but conveniently close to home. The Canberra group is quite large but too far away for frequent personal involvement – but even infrequent would be an improvement on nothing.

If both groups show potential, there should be no reason to choose one above the other. Both are affiliated with the same Pentecostal denomination, and I could combine ongoing involvement with the local people, and occasional visits to those in Canberra. If possible that could become a best of two worlds scenario. From experience and observation, having no or little contact beyond an individual group of Christians can lead to an unfruitful insularity.

But all of that depends on a few factors.

Are they in thrall to fads and non-scriptural practices and ideas? Do they look more to “anointed” men instead of to God? Following the latest celebrity preacher, prophet, or claimed miracle worker, without judging the fruit of their ministries?

Are their beliefs and teachings mostly in line with scripture? If not are they so rigidly fixed upon their doctrines that they refuse the possibility of learning something different should the Lord try to correct them?

And how committed will they be to the members of their congregation. Will they be quick to abandon and shun them should  a member leave their group, instead of maintaining ongoing contact?
Sadly EVERY past experience I’ve had has leaned more to the shunning than any ongoing contact, even when I’ve personally tried to keep in contact, it has always been one way and unreciprocated.

There are a several things I consider to be essentials.

  1. Word based – having God’s word, scripture at the heart of their beliefs
  2.  Spirit filled -recognising the necessity of the Holy Spirit’s work in the individual and the congregation through His sanctifying work, and the operation of His gifts.
  3. Faith based – not doubters, waverers or excuse makers.
  4.  Love based – genuinely caring for people, not just seeing them as seat fillers, increasing the size of their congregation. That also includes maintaining an interest and demonstrating genuine concern for the well-being of anyone who might choose to leave them.
  5.  Have a foundation of prayer, including frequent corporate prayer meetings that are more than a token event.
  6.  With committed members interested in more than only attending Sunday services.
  7.  Genuine recognition of each members role in ministry – in other words, not restricted to a one-man-band, or an elevation of “clergy” above “laity”.

Do I expect too much?
From past experience … probably yes.

But I also want to challenge myself to be more accepting and patient, willing to listen. To trust my discernment. To not dismiss everything just because some things may be wrong. To allow others the room to grow and learn, as I know I need to grow and learn.

And I need to maintain a strength of conviction, to take a stand when necessary, but to do so with love and not impatience and without giving any impression of hostility, recognising that I also need to fulfil those expectations I’ve listed above.