05
Mar
17

Out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation?


Christianity has been made into a very western-centric religion and yet how does that perception reflect statements like the following?

“For You were slain, And have redeemed us to God by Your blood Out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation”.

What does something like that actually look like from a non-colonialist viewpoint, where those from other tribes, tongues and nations don’t have to become like us (in the west) to fit into God’s Kingdom?
Especially when many of those “other tribes and nations” seem to reflect lifestyles more closely in line with biblical standards than our westernised lifestyles.

And then should we consider some of those highly questionable things with which “Christians” in the west have become identified? How many of those things that we think of as normal or acceptable in Christian life are in reality a result of following western cultural norms?

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10 Responses to “Out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation?”


  1. 1 Marleen
    March 7, 2017 at 5:15 am

    I read this during my dad’s funeral services. From the prophet Isaiah (25:6a, 7-9) ~

    On this mountain the LORD of hosts
    will provide for all peoples.

    On this mountain he will destroy
    the veil that veils all peoples —
    the web that is woven over all nations —
    he will destroy death forever.

    The LORD God will wipe away
    the tears from all faces;
    the reproach of his people he will remove
    from the whole earth; for the LORD has spoken.

    [By now, I was outright crying.]

    On that day, it will be said:
    “Behold our God, to whom we looked to save us!
    This is the LORD* for whom we looked;
    let us rejoice and be glad that he has saved us!”

    * As printed, this says “Lord” — but I tend to prefer
    LORD (to remember the standing for YHWH).

  2. March 7, 2017 at 8:16 pm

    Thank you, Marleen. God’s Majesty, indeed !

  3. 3 Marleen
    March 9, 2017 at 6:20 am

    One of my cousins, the one with most faith (who started to take faith deeply when I asked her to think about it while she, her sister, and I were on a vacation with my parents in Florida because her dad was largely out of her life and her mom was working and going to school), read about crying out Abba.

  4. 4 Marleen
    March 15, 2017 at 3:59 am

    Forgive me for talking about my dad again (mostly only mentioning him). The main topic is the glory of God, but these things are on my mind in that context lately because my dad recently died. I started reading a book after those two previous posts, one that was my dad’s last (book) before he died; I don’t know if he got through to the end, but I’m pretty sure he got through three chapters. I started crying at page four. I’ve always felt like faith is a major connection I had (or have) with my dad, so, I have cried the most when thinking of him while studying or reading Bible. [And I have cried before generally at the words … for the Lord has spoken it.

    I think this (following), from page nine, is worth sharing.

    *The Serpent’s Strategy ~
    The law flows from the Father’s heart. But the devil wants Adam and Eve (all of us) to view God’s law apartfrom [h]is love — to see the command merely as a rule, not as an expression of his relationship with us.

    Consider the serpent’s first words to Eve: “Did God say, ‘You shall not eat of any tree of the garden’?” (Gn 3:1). Here, the serpent simply refers to the Lord as “God” (in Hebrew, the word is Elohim). This title is used in Genesis 1 to describe God as the Creator of the universe. The serpent’s use of this title here is particularly striking, because the rest of Genesis 2-3 characteristically refers to God as “the Lord God” (in Hebrew, Yahweh Elohim), which elsewhere in the Bible expresses God’s intimacy with His people as Israel’s covenant partner. In Genesis 2, it is the “Lord God” who creates man from the ground and breathes life into him, who creates the animals and allows Adam to name them, and who creates the woman from Adam’s side. Indeed, the “Lord God” is a loving God, intimately involved in Adam’s and Eve’s lives, providing for them as His children.

    But the serpent will have none of this. He does not call God Yahweh Elohim. He wants Eve to think of God as a remote deity, a distant creator…*

  5. 5 Marleen
    March 15, 2017 at 5:09 am

    I’ve noticed a few obvious typos above, but I think the quoting is readable enough. On the other hand, I forgot to give credit for what I quoted. The book is THE REAL STORY — UNDERSTANDING THE BIG PICTURE OF THE BIBLE, by Edward Sri and Curtis Martin.

    Here is a treatment of “names” so-called, or titles.
    https://www.gotquestions.org/names-of-God.html

    I have seen it said (and I agree) another name is “the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.”

  6. March 15, 2017 at 7:19 am

    The law flows from the Father’s heart. But the devil wants Adam and Eve (all of us) to view God’s law apartfrom [h]is love — to see the command merely as a rule, not as an expression of his relationship with us.

    During a discussion with a man on another site I cited a quote from Jesus that linked love for Him with keeping his commandments – I did a further search and noted there were MANY similar statements throughout Deuteronomy that also linked loving God with the keeping of the commandments. Those things are inseparable and relate to intimate relationship, not to dictatorship.

    I think we can see that at work through God’s patience towards Israel. God clearly had the right to immediately enforce the punishment side of the law (the curse) upon those who persisted in disobedience, but He continued to hold back, giving time for repentance from His people.

    But the serpent will have none of this. He does not call God Yahweh Elohim. He wants Eve to think of God as a remote deity, a distant creator…*

    A very interesting observation.

  7. 7 Marleen
    March 15, 2017 at 7:20 am

    https://www.gotquestions.org/Edom-Obadiah.html

    https://www.gotquestions.org/prophecies-against-Edom.html

    There are additional related links to be found at the bottoms of these pages.

  8. 8 Marleen
    March 15, 2017 at 9:06 am

    “…. a remote deity, a distant creator.*

    A very interesting observation.”

    I hadn’t before seen (as far as I recall) the evaluation of Yahweh Elohim and simply Elohim leading into that. I had heard this (below) before though (while I doubt he had).

    Pages three, through the top of five: *…..

    The way ancient near-eastern cultures like Israel told stories and passed on their history is very different from our own. They did not typically offer straightforward, chronological, “ply-by-play” accounts, as modern-day historians or newspaper reporters might do. Instead, the Biblical writers often organized material by themes and employed elaborate literary techniques that involved repetition, parallelism, allusion, and alliteration — artistry that readers today often miss.

    This is certainly the case with the first chapter of the Bible, Genesis 1. The account of the six days of creation, the divine commands (“Let there be light!”), and God’s rest on the seventh day was never intended to be read like a scientific textbook. Rather, the passage uses figurative language and poetic devices to communicate its beautiful message about creation and God’s plan for the human family. These rich theological points in Genesis 1 are more deeply appreciated when we consider the way the six days of creation unfold in th a narrative.

    Numerous scholars have pointed out that there is a connection in the narrative between the the first three days and the next three days of creation. On the first three days, God creates day and night (first day), sky and sea (second day), and land and vegetation (third day). Then, on the fourth day, God creates the sun, moon, and stars to rule over the day and night, corresponding to what He created on t be first day. On the fifth day, God creates the birds to fill the sky and the fish to fill the sea, corresponding to the second day. And on the sixth day, God creates the the beasts that crawl on the earth, corresponding to the land created on the third day.

    ……. He creates the rulers over those realms in days 4-6 (sun, moon, and stars over time; birds and fish filling sky and sea; and the beasts over the Land). Finally, God creates man and woman….*

  9. March 15, 2017 at 9:40 am

    Numerous scholars have pointed out that there is a connection in the narrative between the the first three days and the next three days of creation.

    I found that very interesting.

    that involved repetition, parallelism, allusion, and alliteration — artistry that readers today often miss.

    I became more aware of that in the creation narrative after I studied a little Anglo Saxon poetry as part of my English Lit degree. Techniques from oral story telling were carried over when the stories were eventually written down.

  10. March 16, 2017 at 12:17 am

    VERY interesting discussion here. Thank you both for these comments !


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